Cloud Racers

space Racing Game


The Team

  • Patrik Nilsson (Level Designer)
  • Niklas Briselius (Level Designer)
  • Björn Stenlund (Programmer)
  • Niklas Hansson (Art)
  • Niklas Utterbäck (Programmer)
  • Patrik K Hansson (Programmer)
  • Jonatan Svensson (Programmer)
  • Joakim Fridholm (Technical Artist)
  • Linus Axelsson (Technical Artist)
  • Olle Hagman (Programmer)
  • Martin Vallin (Art)
  • Oscar Blom (Art)

Contributions

  • Game Design
  • Level Design
    • Level 1
    • Level 3
  • Playtesting
  • Graphical Feedback
  • Bug testing

Specifications and Tools

  • Space racing game
  • Created in ten weeks, half-time
  • Game Engine - ICE Core Engine

Designing the game

We wanted to create a good simple racing game set in space. This was to scope realistically, as we did not know the kind of workload and complications that would come in our way during the development.

We based our game on other games like Superman 64 and the Star Citizen racing mode. This made the design very easy for us, as we had a lot of good references.

The game-mode that we decided to use was Time Trial, due to it being quite easy and fun to implement, and it's something that a lot of players already are familiar with.

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During this project we had a lot of problems with the workflow and the pipeline. We often got stuck, and often had to redo a lot of the work to try to figure out a more effective way to work.

We also learnt a lot about working in a group under the short time that we spend on every game, and our iteration cycles became quite comfortable for us.

 


Iterations

First iteration of the level that I made the first week. We quickly had rings in the game, which made creating the levels easier.

First iteration of the level that I made the first week. We quickly had rings in the game, which made creating the levels easier.

Final screenshot from the game, the same level. It changed a lot during the development!

Final screenshot from the game, the same level. It changed a lot during the development!

When making the levels we always started out with a blockout in Maya or Unity, depending on how we felt would be the fastest way to work. I usually made mine in Maya, as that was my preferred workflow for blocking out. I then imported that model into Unity, and used it as a reference for building the actual track.

We then proceed to play-test the levels a lot, and changed corners around quite a lot. This made the levels feel good and we were able to reiterate on the levels quite a lot, making the final result a better game.


Closing thoughts

Working on this project was hard, and we made a lot of mistakes that took a lot of time away from actually developing the game. We did however learn a ton from this experience, and it really helped us move further into other game projects. If I could redo this project, I would focus a lot more on the flow of the levels, instead of just propping them with buildings to look good. I would probably also orient the map around a central main object for every level, that was a main landmark unique to that level, a castle or a statue for example.